Hydrotech Data

March 20, 2010 Documents 0 Comments

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The water quality looks good.  There’s nothing obviously wrong with the drawdown test – it looks like a 2000 liters/hr flowrate works for the well.  You may be able to get more, although it may not be necessary if you are going with a 1000 l/hr hand pump.  I’ve got some books in another office which help in interpreting drawdown information – I can look at this again in a couple of weeks when I am back in my regular office.
I like the idea of getting hand pump in the well now and, depending on how that goes, working on something fancier later.  I don’t know how far spread-out the village is, so I don’t know how far they would be hauling the water.  There are also a lot of sustainable options which make water hauling a lot easier (basically ball shaped buckets that roll like a wheelbarrow or donut shaped buckets which can easily be pulled with a string.)  Though, the old “bucket on the head” technique is just fine as long as people aren’t going several kilometers.
There are a couple types of hand pumps available.  Make sure the one you select can get water from deep depths.  The pump mechanism will need to be in the hole, not something on the surface since the water is too deep for you to suck it out.  Afridev is good for deep conditions like this.  Afridev pumps are not really a brand name – they are more of a development franchise.  All the vendors work off the same specifications, so the parts are interchangeable and should be the same quality.  I’ve also heard of NIRA pumps, but I don’t know as much about them.
Did you get any idea of the population you are dealing with?  If the community is large, a hand-pump well will not cover all their needs and they might need to be selective on what they use the well water for.  As an example, they could use the well water for drinking and cooking, but not for bathing and laundry.  They should establish those rules themselves, though.  Is there a water committee established yet?
If they have someone pumping 12 hours a day (trading off, of course) at 1000 liters per hour, they will get 12,000 liters per day.  Basic household water needs (cooking, drinking, bathing) are about 15 liters per person per day.  Up that by at least 10 liters per person per day if you want to include laundry uses.

The water quality looks good.  There’s nothing obviously wrong with the drawdown test – it looks like a 2000 liters/hr flowrate works for the well.  You may be able to get more, although it may not be necessary if you are going with a 1000 l/hr hand pump.  I’ve got some books in another office which help in interpreting drawdown information – I can look at this again in a couple of weeks when I am back in my regular office.  I like the idea of getting hand pump in the well now and, depending on how that goes, working on something fancier later.  I don’t know how far spread-out the village is, so I don’t know how far they would be hauling the water.  There are also a lot of sustainable options which make water hauling a lot easier (basically ball shaped buckets that roll like a wheelbarrow or donut shaped buckets which can easily be pulled with a string.)  Though, the old “bucket on the head” technique is just fine as long as people aren’t going several kilometers. There are a couple types of hand pumps available.  Make sure the one you select can get water from deep depths.  The pump mechanism will need to be in the hole, not something on the surface since the water is too deep for you to suck it out.  Afridev is good for deep conditions like this.  Afridev pumps are not really a brand name – they are more of a development franchise.  All the vendors work off the same specifications, so the parts are interchangeable and should be the same quality.  I’ve also heard of NIRA pumps, but I don’t know as much about them.  Did you get any idea of the population you are dealing with?  If the community is large, a hand-pump well will not cover all their needs and they might need to be selective on what they use the well water for.  As an example, they could use the well water for drinking and cooking, but not for bathing and laundry.  They should establish those rules themselves, though.  Is there a water committee established yet?  If they have someone pumping 12 hours a day (trading off, of course) at 1000 liters per hour, they will get 12,000 liters per day.  Basic household water needs (cooking, drinking, bathing) are about 15 liters per person per day.  Up that by at least 10 liters per person per day if you want to include laundry uses.

The water quality looks good.  There’s nothing obviously wrong with the drawdown test – it looks like a 2000 liters/hr flowrate works for the well.  You may be able to get more, although it may not be necessary if you are going with a 1000 l/hr hand pump.  I’ve got some books in another office which help in interpreting drawdown information – I can look at this again in a couple of weeks when I am back in my regular office.I like the idea of getting hand pump in the well now and, depending on how that goes, working on something fancier later.  I don’t know how far spread-out the village is, so I don’t know how far they would be hauling the water.  There are also a lot of sustainable options which make water hauling a lot easier (basically ball shaped buckets that roll like a wheelbarrow or donut shaped buckets which can easily be pulled with a string.)  Though, the old “bucket on the head” technique is just fine as long as people aren’t going several kilometers.There are a couple types of hand pumps available.  Make sure the one you select can get water from deep depths.  The pump mechanism will need to be in the hole, not something on the surface since the water is too deep for you to suck it out.  Afridev is good for deep conditions like this.  Afridev pumps are not really a brand name – they are more of a development franchise.  All the vendors work off the same specifications, so the parts are interchangeable and should be the same quality.  I’ve also heard of NIRA pumps, but I don’t know as much about them.Did you get any idea of the population you are dealing with?  If the community is large, a hand-pump well will not cover all their needs and they might need to be selective on what they use the well water for.  As an example, they could use the well water for drinking and cooking, but not for bathing and laundry.  They should establish those rules themselves, though.  Is there a water committee established yet?If they have someone pumping 12 hours a day (trading off, of course) at 1000 liters per hour, they will get 12,000 liters per day.  Basic household water needs (cooking, drinking, bathing) are about 15 liters per person per day.  Up that by at least 10 liters per person per day if you want to include laundry uses.

The water quality looks good.  There’s nothing obviously wrong with the drawdown test – it looks like a 2000 liters/hr flowrate works for the well.  You may be able to get more, although it may not be necessary if you are going with a 1000 l/hr hand pump.  I’ve got some books in another office which help in interpreting drawdown information – I can look at this again in a couple of weeks when I am back in my regular office.

The water quality looks good.  There’s nothing obviously wrong with the drawdown test – it looks like a 2000 liters/hr flowrate works for the well.  You may be able to get more, although it may not be necessary if you are going with a 1000 l/hr hand pump.  I’ve got some books in another office which help in interpreting drawdown information – I can look at this again in a couple of weeks when I am back in my regular office.